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On this day, February 5, 1846,The first Pacific Coast newspaper, Oregon Spectator, was published.




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The Oregon Constitution
Wednesday, February 22, 2023 at 7:00 pm
First of a three part series presented by former State Representative Mike Nearman studying the Oregon Constitution.
The River Church 4675 Portland Rd NE Salem



The Oregon Constitution
Wednesday, March 1, 2023 at 7:00 pm
Second of a three part series presented by former State Representative Mike Nearman studying the Oregon Constitution.
The River Church 4675 Portland Rd NE Salem



The Oregon Constitution
Wednesday, March 8, 2023 at 7:00 pm
Third of a three part series presented by former State Representative Mike Nearman studying the Oregon Constitution.
The River Church 4675 Portland Rd NE Salem



We Are Stronger Together
Monday, March 27, 2023 at 10:00 am
Oregon's Natural Resources & Industries (ONRI) is sponsoring the rally to meet legislators and influencers to bring light on legislation affecting natural resource industries, their families, and their communities. https://onri.us/events
Rally at the State Capitol, Salem.


View All Calendar Events


CRC May Become Casualty of Transportation Wars
“If the majority party thought we would turn a blind eye they are mistaken”

Several Oregon Republicans are prepared to abandon a bi-state committee currently negotiating the Interstate Bridge Replacement between Oregon and Washington if the Washington Legislature passes a 6-cent tax on Oregonians’ fuel.

“Republicans will not stand by and let Washington raise the cost-of-living for our residents without a fight,” said Senator Lynn P. Findley (R-Vale), a member of the Bi-state committee.

“If the majority party in Washington thought we would turn a blind eye when they force us to pay for their roads, they are mistaken,” added Representative Shelly Boshart Davis (R-Albany), who also serves on the committee. “If this unconstitutional tax passes, then Washington should pay the entire cost of the Interstate Bridge Replacement themselves.”

According to a 2019 audit of the Columbia River Crossing project done by the Oregon Secretary of State, "The Columbia River Crossing, otherwise known as the CRC, was a bi-state megaproject to build a bridge between the cities of Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington. The new bridge would have replaced and modernized the existing stretch of Interstate 5 (I-5) that currently connects the two cities across the Columbia River. The two states’ Departments of Transportation formed a joint CRC project team in 2004 to manage this effort.

"The intent of the project was to improve safety, reduce congestion, and increase mobility of motorists, freight traffic, transit riders, bicyclists, and pedestrians in a notoriously congested section of I-5. To finance the effort, the CRC team developed a plan that relied on federal, state, and toll funding. However, after Oregon passed legislation in 2013 to authorize its $450 million share, Washington failed to follow suit. As a result, after nine years of planning and millions of dollars spent, the CRC project was terminated in 2014 without any construction."

Some insiders see the Washington tax proposal as retaliation for Oregon's proposal to toll parts of interstates 5 and 205.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-02-25 06:17:07Last Update: 2022-02-24 21:19:09



$400 Million Package to Respond to Homelessness Passes
It comes to over $27,000 per homeless person

According to the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, "as of January 2020, Oregon had an estimated 14,655 experiencing homelessness on any given day, as reported by Continuums of Care to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Of that Total, 825 were family households, 1,329 were Veterans, 1,314 were unaccompanied young adults (aged 18-24), and 4,339 were individuals experiencing chronic homelessness."

The Oregon Legislature has passed a $400 million package to address immediate needs around homelessness, build on current spending to increase the supply of affordable housing, keep people in affordable homes and prevent displacement. If that money were divided among the 14,655 homeless in Oregon, it would come to over $27,000 per homeless person, in addition to what is already being spent.

“We have heard from Oregonians that they want to see action to address homelessness and housing affordability and solutions that work,” said House Majority Leader Julie Fahey (D-West Eugene/Junction City), who also serves as Chair of the House Committee on Housing. “This funding plan will invest in effective state, local and community-based efforts that will prioritize getting unhoused people on the path out of homelessness.”

“I’m proud of what we accomplished through this package,” said Senator Kayse Jama (D-Portland), Chair of the Senate Committee on Housing. “These resources are key to supporting people experiencing houselessness and keeping folks off the street to prevent homelessness, so we can continue to make progress around housing stabilization.”

“I would like to express our deep gratitude to the Legislature for their leadership support in understanding cities’ immediate needs and responding to our request for assistance by bringing forth a comprehensive housing and homeless investment package,” said Mayor Lucy Vinis of Eugene. “We recognize this challenge is multi-faceted, and demands a partnership between cities, counties, service providers, businesses, and community members.”

“Salem is facing a homeless crisis like communities across the state. It is our duty to address this crisis with urgency,” said Representative Paul Evans (D-Monmouth). “Success will depend on coordination between state and local governments, and the flexibility for local communities like Salem to execute a distinct, regional solution. I’m proud to support this multifaceted approach.”

“These pilot programs will create a more equitable, accessible and responsive system by helping our local governments and community partners provide high-level coordination, centralizing communication, and strategic planning and implementation,” said Representative Jason Kropf (D-Bend), chief sponsor of the bill.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-02-25 06:14:46Last Update: 2022-02-24 21:30:23



Governor Brown Lifts Emergency
Or does she?

Many are confused on when the pandemic can be put in the history file and burned. Oregon headlines has an excitement in the air. Indoor mask mandate will be dropped on March 19, but Governor Kate Brown announced that she will be lifting Oregon’s COVID-19 state of emergency on April 1. Why the difference?

Most of the Governor’s executive orders regarding COVID-19 were rescinded on June 30, 2021. In responding to the subsequent Delta and Omicron surges of COVID-19, the Governor for the most part did not use her executive authority to issue new emergency orders. She did take other steps, such as activating the Oregon National Guard to help support hospital workers, and coordinating with the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to bring skilled healthcare workers to Oregon to support hospital and long-term care facility staff. Let’s not forget OHA’s temporary masking rules turned permanent just three weeks ago for no good reason except to have that option available for instant access to use against citizens.

Since June 30, 2021, the state of emergency was shifted to an emergency declaration that provided the Governor with flexibility and resources for COVID-19 response and recovery efforts, including allowing for the use of SERV-OR volunteer medical providers in hospitals, providing flexibility around professional health licensing, and ensuring Oregon could access all available federal disaster relief funds available, such as enhanced SNAP benefits. To codify that flexibility, SB 1529 is being rushed through by Senator Deb Patterson (D-Salem), chair of the Senate Committee on Health Care.

SB 1529 redefines ‘Health care emergency’ to allow the Public Health Director (OHA) to declare if there exists a disease outbreak, epidemic or other condition of public health importance statewide or in a specified geographic area of this state.

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The Governor made sure to exonerate herself and let us know more restrictions are on the horizon without her declaring a state of emergency. Safety requirements in place today regarding masks, vaccinations for K-12 educators and staff, and vaccinations for healthcare workers do not rely on the state of emergency declaration––instead, they are covered by state or federal agency administrative rules issued under existing non-emergency state or federal authority.

SB 1529 is headed to the House floor for its final vote.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-02-24 17:39:43Last Update: 2022-02-24 18:14:46



Kate Brown Announces End to COVID Emergency
Will happen on April Fools’ day

Oregon's Governor Kate Brown has announced that she will be lifting Oregon’s COVID-19 emergency declaration, effective April 1.

She says that COVID-19 hospitalizations and case numbers continue to drop rapidly across Oregon as the Omicron variant recedes.

“Over the past six months, as Oregon weathered our worst surges of the pandemic, I’m proud of the way Oregonians have worked together to keep each other safe,” said Governor Brown. “Lifting Oregon’s COVID-19 emergency declaration today does not mean that the pandemic is over, or that COVID-19 is no longer a significant concern. But, as we have shown through the Delta and Omicron surges, as we learn to live with this virus, and with so many Oregonians protected by safe and effective vaccines, we can now protect ourselves, our friends, and our families without invoking the extraordinary emergency authorities that were necessary at the beginning of the pandemic."

“COVID-19 is still present in Oregon, and we must remain vigilant. We must continue to get vaccinated and boosted, wear masks when necessary, and stay home when sick. That is the only way we can achieve our shared goals of saving lives and keeping our schools, businesses, and communities open.”

Some of the Governor’s executive orders regarding COVID-19 were rescinded on June 30, 2021. But excessive restrictions continued.

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Kate Brown says she wanted to ensure Oregon could access all available federal disaster relief funds available, such as enhanced SNAP benefits.

According to Governor Brown, requirements in place currently regarding controversial masks and vaccine mandates for educators, staff and healthcare workers do not rely on the state of emergency declaration––instead, they are covered by state or federal agency administrative rules issued under existing non-emergency state or federal authority.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-02-24 13:51:39Last Update: 2022-02-24 14:07:53



Mark Johnson Announces Run for Clackamas Commissioner
Longtime resident of Clackamas County

Mark Johnson has announced he is running for Clackamas County Commissioner. He has deep roots in Clackamas County and has lived there most of his life.

Mark was active in Future Farmers of America and student leadership before going on to study agriculture, business and accounting. He is a known chinchilla farmer in the area.

"We need more local control of our forests," said Johnson, commenting on excessive wildfires recently experienced in Oregon. "Active management will keep our county from burning."

Mark says he would be an independent leader, not beholden to any political parties or special interest groups

"I will govern with a sense of principled consistency," said Johnson.

His family has owned multiple local businesses throughout the years, and Mark has helped run them. Those include metal fabrication shops, vineyards and sheep and cattle ranching operations.

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Mark says he is running for commissioner to bring principled and consistent leadership back to Clackamas County. He intends to work with the other commissioners to find solutions to the difficult issues faced by county residents, including transportation and housing.

"I will work to make the county development codes more flexible for anyone wanting to build housing," Johnson said. "We can allow more growth in rural areas without turning them into suburbs."


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-02-24 11:17:11Last Update: 2022-02-21 18:05:11



Proposed Alternative Solution to Ag Overtime
Republicans seek compromise

Oregon Representative Shelly Boshart Davis (R-Albany) is submitting an agriculture overtime proposal from agriculture communities to find a unique solution to meet the needs of Oregon’s farm employees and preserves the state’s agricultural sectors.

This plan would offer state money to essential farm employees with a $50 million dollar grant and protects their health and safety.

With this proposal employees would have new overtime earning opportunities while providing farmers and ranchers with flexibility for crop harvests dictated by time and weather.

As Oregonians committed to an Oregon solution, the plan proposes overtime pay at 48 hours and with overtime at 55 hours during a limited period when harvesting is busiest.

Salaried workers, many who need flexibility to care for livestock, could make a base salary exceeding $36,000 in rural counties while earning overtime pay when they work more than 55 hours a week.

“We will continue to ask our colleagues to come to the table for an Oregon solution to overtime,” said Representative Shelly Boshart Davis (R-Albany), a third-generation farmer. “This plan incorporates feedback from the agriculture community and recognizes two critical needs we all value: the health, safety and economic opportunity for our farm workforce; and the fickle nature of our diverse agricultural and rural economies that are heavily dependent on seasons and weather.”

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“A true Oregon solution to agriculture overtime will fulfill our obligation of putting the health and future opportunities of our workforce first,” said Representative Daniel Bonham (R-The Dalles), Vice-Chair of the House Business and Labor Committee. “We look forward to working with labor advocates and the farming community to gain support for an approach that puts money directly into the hands of our important workforce, while protecting their jobs and our family-owned farms and ranches.”

“Our farmers and ranchers aren’t looking for a hand-out, we just want to keep farming,” added Rep. Boshart Davis. “Our farmworkers and our farms are facing a myriad of headwinds, from skyrocketing inflation to shipping costs to decreasing commodity prices due to competition from other states and countries. We’re proud to answer the call to find an Oregon solution.”


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-02-23 16:39:42Last Update: 2022-02-23 16:56:56



Is the Oregon Legislature Fighting Inflation?
Cost of Living Relief for a Select Group

A recent press release from the House Speaker and Senate President is titled, “Cost of Living Relief Package Will Target Childcare Affordability and Support Working Families.” They say as the cost-of-living spikes across the country, the Oregon Legislature is working on a relief package to put money back in Oregonians’ pockets and drive down the cost of everyday necessities like childcare.

There are a couple things wrong with this statement. Putting money back into a priority population is government picking winners and losers. It isn’t constitutional equality; it is Democrat equity.

What package? It is something the Ways and Means does in a full session to establish the biennium budget. A short session was intended to adjust things that weren’t quit on target in the biennium budget. When they say they are working on a relief package, they do mean it is more than an adjustment to the budget. It’s more like a redistribution of how you spend your income.

Unless you follow every legislative hearing, you’d have no idea what is coming in this package, and since they don’t mention the bill numbers, it’s still hard to tell. The press release wasn’t aimed at hardworking Oregonians. The relief is specifically aimed at priority populations, otherwise known as underserved minorities.

Recently Representative Wilde debilitated his Democrat party in a letter to the Oregonian, on how the Democrat House Caucus was hiding things from the public and decision made behind closed doors. Including lack of transparency and engagement, Wilde says they have “stopped supporting laws that returned power to the people we represent. Instead, we let our partisan desire to maintain power override our duty to the people… Over time, we even stopped debating the issues, as caucuses became a forum for leadership to give orders to ensure the Democratic agenda prevailed over the Republicans’ agenda, regardless of whether it was in the public interest… The House Democratic leaders even stopped telling the caucus members about their discussions. In effect, the content and direction of legislation for all of Oregon was decided by a group of 10 or fewer people picked by their ability to raise money, in secret.”

If the press release is an effort in transparency, it is only a crumb. Senator Deb Patterson (D-Salem) states, “We need to make targeted investments to drive down the costs that are burdening hardworking folks in my district and around the state. That means building up programs that can help Oregon families protect their pocketbook – investments in childcare and early learning are central to this effort.” The package consists of three areas: affordable childcare, low-income worker payments, and earned-income tax credit outreach.

Affordable childcare is to address the shortage of affordable childcare across the state. The funding package will support providers who accept Employment Related Day Care (ERDC) subsidies, leading to more equitable rates and giving more options to parents who utilize ERDC. This support includes recruitment and retention payments to childcare workers; recruiting and training of new childcare providers; direct grants to expand existing childcare facilities; and other investments to make our public childcare system more equitable for parents. What this means is that eligible ERDC families that for a family of three doesn’t have a gross income of more than $3,660 monthly income will have more options for child care.

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The second package item is low-income worker payments providing a one-time payment of $600 first failed funded by a sales tax. When that didn’t fly, they pushed a bill funded by the Oregon Worker Relief Fund to pay 240,000 low-income workers costing $144 million. Senator Kathleen Taylor (D-Portland), chair of the Senate Committee on Labor and Business, said, “It has become more difficult for low-wage workers to afford basic necessities, like rent, food, and childcare, as the cost of living continues to rise. We have an urgent opportunity to support the equitable recovery of our workforce by sending relief to low-wage individuals and working families with the greatest need.” It’s undetermined where this authorization comes from, but they neglect to mention HB 4122 sponsored by Representative Ricki Ruiz (D-Gresham) and others, which pays $695 to DACA qualified to cover the costs of DACA renewal costing taxpayers $7 million.

To complete their package is an earned-income tax credit (EITC) outreach that strengthens the resources available to help navigate the tax system and access the credit. Representative Ruiz said. “This will support Oregon’s economic recovery and lift up communities across the state by providing individuals and working families with support to receive the benefits of the earned-income tax credit.” To summarize, the “Cost of Living Relief Package” isn’t intended for everyone, but everyone will pay for it.


--Donna Bleiler

Post Date: 2022-02-23 15:45:18Last Update: 2022-02-23 20:17:07



Multnomah County Judge Appointed by Kate Brown
Gates is assigned to the Family Law Department

Oregon's Governor Kate Brown announced today that she will appoint Maurisa Gates to the Multnomah County Circuit Court. Gates will fill the vacancy created by the retirement of Judge Kathleen M. Dailey. Her position will be assigned to the court’s Family Law Department.

Gates’ appointment is effective immediately.

“Maurisa Gates is a skilled attorney who has spent decades working with the most vulnerable in our community—particularly children—as they navigate the justice system,” Governor Brown said. “I look forward to seeing her bring her compassion, empathy, and commitment to procedural fairness to her work as a judge on the family law bench.”

Gates has served as a public defender for more than 25 years, spending much of that time representing juvenile clients.

She grew up in Detroit, Michigan, attending school in the Detroit Public Schools Community District. Gates attended Wayne State University for her undergraduate degree, and then went on to earn her law degree from the same university. After graduating from law school, she worked in Detroit representing juveniles in delinquency and dependency cases for nearly five years before moving to Portland in 2000 and joining the Metropolitan Public Defender office (MPD). In 2006, Gates moved to the juvenile unit of MPD, and has remained there ever since. She currently serves as a senior attorney in that office.

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Gates has acted as a co-trainer for the Juvenile Immersion Training Program at the Oregon Criminal Defense Lawyers Association juvenile conference and as the Western Division Board Member for the State of Oregon for the National Juvenile Defender Center.

She has served on the Multnomah Bar Association’s Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Committee.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-02-23 13:53:12Last Update: 2022-02-23 14:13:38



Flexible Education Key to One Actor’s Success
Pride and Prejudice to be Performed in Dallas

When the curtains go up for the Dallas High School Theatre production of Pride and Prejudice (February 24th-26th) one of the leading roles will be played by a 16-year old actor who attends a statewide online public school for K-12 students. Kason Utz from Dallas is a sophomore at Willamette Connections Academy.

“We feel so fortunate that Dallas High School has allowed him to participate with the other students and we’re excited to see him experience the social aspects of school through extracurricular activities and watch him do what he loves to do on stage,” said Kason’s mother Nicole Utz.

Dallas High School Thespians and Theatre Troupe presents Pride and Prejudice by Kate Hamill (dhstheatre.org/shows) February 24th, 25th, and 26th at 7 pm each night. There’s also 2 pm performance on February 26th. For ticket information go to dhstheatre.org/buy-tickets Kason appreciates the following the theatre program has generated from the community. “Dallas High School’s program has kind of a small town feel and it isn’t the biggest or most advanced, but most of its impressiveness comes from the people involved,” said Kason. “The leadership is very caring while keeping things on track. The community support from funding and volunteering allows the program put on higher quality shows.”

In the cast of Pride and Prejudice, Kason plays a character named Fitzwilliam Darcy, a wealthy arrogant high society English gentleman suitor to Lizzy Bennet, one of five sisters looking for potential husbands in the early 1800s. “To me, the story is about how real love has nothing to do with status, anyone no matter how rich or successful they are can love anyone,” observed Kason. “You see that a few times in this show where people defy expectations or follow them.”

“Kason is our shining star as an actor, entertaining our friends and family around the campfire at a very young age,” Nicole Utz noted. “We have always been so proud of him and all he has accomplished.”

However, Kason didn’t try to get his name printed on a playbill until 6th grade when his middle school drama teacher inspired him to pour himself into acting roles. Since then, he’s landed lead roles in several productions and acted in seven plays, including Frozen, The Little Mermaid, and Mary Poppins.

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“Pride and Prejudice has been a great show for me, for a few reasons,” explained Kason. “The main ones are more personal, I love being around the people I’m with in this show, and this is my first high school show.”

According to Kason, the flexibility he has with Willamette Connections Academy’s online program gives him the ability to pursue his passion for activities outside school. “There’s no way I could do this in any other educational environment. With this online school I can pursue various things that would be impossible to schedule around in a regular school setting. Now it’s great because I can just take an hour off and do whatever I want, I don’t have to be in that cram, study, stressful mindset each day.”

“Our family has always appreciated the opportunities offered to our son with alternative public education,” added Nicole Utz. “We found Willamette Connections Academy during the summer of 2020 when we learned his previous school would not be returning to classroom learning and we wanted to ensure Kason had a solid start to his freshman year in high school.”

The family was motivated to switch to a full-time virtual public school because they felt it was a better fit for Kason’s learning needs. They also wanted something more than distance education programs implemented by the traditional school system.

“Kason has always done well in a traditional brick and mortar school but has struggled with behavioral issues of disruptive children in the classroom who continually disrespected rules and authority. He values respect and his elders greatly and this became an almost daily distraction for his learning environment,” noted Nicole Utz. “I know the move to distance learning was a very difficult change to suddenly take brick and mortar teachers and place them into virtual classrooms. The technology alone had to be very challenging and we sought out something for Kason with years of online experience.”

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Kason’s mom was thrilled to see her son thriving in his learning environment and taking AP level classes. It was his choice with his parent’s support to continue with Willamette Connections Academy after the regular brick-and-mortar schools opened their doors again. “Stability is the main reason I wanted to attend Connections Academy. Brick and mortar school was often very stressful. The amount of freedom I have with Connections, to control how my day goes, has allowed me to be successful in schooling, without sacrificing the enjoyment of life.”

Kason appreciates being able to attend a statewide online charter school and still be able to participate in extracurricular activities at the regular public school whether it’s theatre or sports. “All it takes is a little motivation, and you can turn that into a drive to make yourself happy by no means other than yourself. I’ve been lucky to see that happen, and I’m very grateful to be a part of this show,” said Kason.

While he likes acting, Kason is also interested in other types of performing arts like filmmaking, and technical work. Kason might continue theatre as a hobby, but after high school he plans to enter the military. “While in this production as Mr. Darcy, I’ve learned a lot about myself. I decided to become healthier by eating better, and exercising,” said Kason. “I’ve also gotten less nervous in social settings. I’ve seen a definite improvement, and I really enjoy it.”


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-02-22 13:35:05Last Update: 2022-02-22 15:45:18



Male Suspect Enters Home and Strangles Woman in Shower
Had been arrested twice earlier in the day

On February 12, 2022 at approximately 12:33PM, officers from the Corvallis Police Department responded to the 200 block of SW 7th Street for a report a burglary that occurred moments earlier.

The caller reported a male suspect had entered he and his girlfriend’s residence, and then attacked his girlfriend while she was in the shower. The victim reported the male pulled his pants down to his knees, while opening the shower door.

The victim attempted to flee the bathroom, at which time the male grabbed her by the shoulders, shoving her against the bathroom wall, strangulating her with both of his hands. The victim continued to fight off her attacker as he continually grabbed at her and prevented her from escaping the bathroom.

Awoken by the victim’s screams, the caller reported entering the bathroom where he saw the male suspect standing over the victim who was laying on the floor.

The caller confronted the suspect, causing the male to flee from the residence towards SW Jefferson Ave. Both the caller and the victim were able to provide a description of the male suspect to officers as they were responding.

Officers began canvassing the neighborhood and located a male matching the description nearby. Through their investigation, officers were able to determine the suspect, now identified as Garrett Caspino (29) of Albany and Corvallis, was the suspect in the attack.

Prior to the attack on SW 7th Street, Caspino had been arrested twice earlier in the day by Corvallis Police Offices.

Officers originally contacted Caspino at approximately 10:53 AM in the 200 block of SW 2nd Street where Caspino was reported to have entered an unlocked vehicle. The caller in that incident reported finding Caspino sitting in the driver seat of the vehicle and acting “totally out there.”

Caspino was arrested for Criminal Trespass, but due to the severity of the crime not meeting the criteria for booking and lodging at the jail, Caspino was transported to the Law Enforcement Center. Caspino was issued a citation to appear in court and released.

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A short time later, an officer was conducting vehicle maintenance in the restricted parking area of the Law Enforcement Center when he was alerted to a male concealing himself in the behind a pillar. Caspino was contacted a second time and once again cited for Criminal Trespassing. Caspino was transported to the area on NW Monroe Ave and NW 6th Street to facilitate his access to local service providers. Caspino was last seen in the area at approximately 11:50 AM.

Upon his third arrest, and due to the severity of the crimes, Caspino met the criteria to be booked and lodged at the Benton County Jail. Caspino was transported to the jail at approximately 2:48 PM where he was booked on the following charges: Effective January 1, 2022, and in accordance with Oregon House Bill 3273, the Corvallis Police Department is prohibited from releasing a booking photo of the suspect in this investigation.

HB 3273 was sponsored by Representative Janelle Bynum (D-Clackamas), Representative Teresa Alonso Leon (D-Woodburn), Representative Ron Noble (R-McMinnville), as well as other Democrats.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-02-21 18:05:11Last Update: 2022-02-22 08:50:40



Salem City Councilor Resigns
Ward 8 needs new representation

Salem City Councilor Jim Lewis has resigned his position effective February 14, 2022.

The longest-serving member currently among the City Councilors, Councilor Lewis has represented Ward 8 in West Salem since January 2015. Lewis, whose term expires December 31, 2022, had announced that he would not seek re-election.

“It is with great sadness and disappointment that I must submit my resignation from the Salem City Council.” Councilor Lewis continues, “Lingering medical issues, family obligations and celebrations are keeping me from fulfilling my obligations to the position of City Councilor. I want to thank the City of Salem especially the residents of West Salem for giving me the opportunity to serve my community. I wish everyone the best and may God bless the City of Salem.”

In his capacity on the City Council, Lewis has represented Salem and contributed to regional transportation policy and funding of projects through his service to the Mid-Willamette Area Commission on Transportation and the Salem-Keizer Area Transportation Study Policy.

Lewis also represents Salem on the Travel Salem Board and Executive Committee. Most recently, Lewis has served on the City Council’s Legislative Committee, Steering Committee for the Community Improvement Bond, and the City’s Water/Wastewater Task Force and Systems Development Charge Methodology Committee.

Those interested in filling the vacancy created by the resignation of Councilor Lewis will be required to submit an application to the City Council, be registered to vote and have lived in Ward 8 for 12 months prior to appointment.

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The appointment would last until the term expires on December 31, 2022.

The Salem City Council is composed of one representative from each of Salem’s eight wards and the Mayor.

All members of the City Council, including the Mayor, are unpaid volunteers. In addition to twice monthly City Council meetings, Members of the Council may participate in many community activities and meetings, including City Council Work Sessions, other workshops, neighborhood association meetings, committee meetings, and other events.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-02-21 15:07:54Last Update: 2022-02-21 17:44:49



63 Ag Commissioner Positions Open
Must apply by March 15

The Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) seeks volunteers to fill 63 commissioner seats on 22 of the state’s agricultural and commercial fisheries commodity commissions. The deadline to apply is March 15. For instructions on applying or learning more about commissions, please visit their website.

ODA Director Alexis Taylor appoints commissioners, most serve three-year terms.

Their duties include making decisions about funding for promotion, education, and research projects.

Director Taylor is looking for applicants who represent Oregon’s farmers, ranchers, processors, and commercial fisheries. For public members, users of the commodity who have an interest and time to serve are often the best fit.

A public member must be a US citizen, an Oregon resident, and have an active interest in improving economic conditions for the commodity. A public member cannot be directly associated with producing or handling the specific commodity they seek to serve.

Applicants for producer or handler positions must also be a US citizen, an Oregon resident, and have paid or collected the assessment for that particular commodity for the previous three years or longer in some cases.

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A producer is defined as a grower or harvester. A handler is the first to buy the commodity from the producer and is often a processor, distributor, or marketer.

The following commodity commissions have openings:



For more information about Oregon’s Commodity Commissions or the application process, please contact Kris Anderson, ODA Commodity Oversight Program Manager via email or by phone (503)-970-3260.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-02-20 15:49:05Last Update: 2022-02-20 17:43:27



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